LP Yang

It was a struggle to get this article interview done, with both our times being filled with other projects and obligations. We actually managed to finish this interview, even if it was through e-mail. Paul “LP” Yang is a deep thinker, writing songs about everyday lives and political issues which eventually will affect everyone. With much determination, Yang has scored major underground hits with DJs and clubs around Wisconsin, Minnesota, Illinois and other states with his debut entitled “It’s Time”, “Bounce That” and “My First Love”. Yang is currently working on his second album “Still Grindin” while his debut still roaring through the internet on Reverbnation and Facebook.com. Not to forget, Yang is already widely known in the Hmong community and those who are fans of hip-hop music.

One of the most anticipated new solo artists in the Hmong community hits the music industry with fresh cutting edge lyrics filled with a brand new beat giving the Hmong community a break-through towards other Asian ethnicities here in America. Paul “LP” Yang, Hmong’s newest hip-hop has made 2006 the best year in the Hmong music industry. His self-titled debut album “It’s Time” was originally released in his hometown of Detroit, not too far away from where he currently lives, Eastpointe, MI.

For fan’s sake, LP stands for Lyrical Producer. This 20-year-old hip-hop artist, executive producer, and songwriter started rapping at the tender age of 13. First, it was just for fun but by the time LP was 15 he started making beats and knew he was going to get somewhere with his music. LP is the first Hmong solo artist who has crossed over into other Asian communities making a name for himself and establishing a cultural phenomenon.

The whole concept of the song was to let Hmong people know that we need to stick together in order to make a difference.

ASIANCE: What made you jump into signing on with Shaolin Entertainment?
PY: I signed with them because I saw that they were serious with their music like me and they are pretty well known.

ASIANCE: Were you pretty confident that you were going to make it big, even if it’s in the Hmong community? Do you plan to expand it towards other Asian communities?
PY: Yeah, you can say that I was pretty confident. But I just did what I did and let the music speak for itself. Even from the beginning, my main focus wasn’t only for the Hmong community; it was for the music industry itself. As for expanding my music to other Asians, that’s already done.

ASIANCE: What do your parents think about this music career you have going for yourself? Do they support you in this? Do you also work, besides producing your own music?
PY: Yeah my parents support it but only to a certain point. And do I have a job? Yeah, I do but that’s for me to know and yall to find out.

ASIANCE: What was your experience working with Rare, who of course are the business partners of Shaolin Entertainment?
PY: Rare is like family. They taught me a lot and showed me the ropes of the music business world.

ASIANCE: Did they also teach you how to write, how to record, to mix and match your lyrics? Or did you do that all on your own?
PY: Nah they didn’t. I knew all these before we met. But they helped out a lot on promoting my music and boosting the quality of it.

ASIANCE: While recording in the studio, is it hard to get the right beat, harmony, music or tone?
PY: Well it depends. Most of the time it’s pretty easy, but if I’m not in the mood, it can get difficult.

ASIANCE: What does Shaolin Entertainment mean to you? How was the experience?
PY: They mean a lot. If it wasn’t for them, yall wouldn’t know who LP is. The experience was great. I know I have a strong team behind me.

ASIANCE: Did you travel all the way to Milwaukee to record your songs, or is there a studio in your hometown where you can make some of your music?
PY: Yeah I traveled to Milwaukee to record the first album but for the second one, I’m going to record it here.

ASIANCE: I’ve also heard some of your songs which concern the Hmong people in Laos, Thailand and other areas, as well as the Hmong’s here in America. Are going through the whole phase of rebellion, drugs, and partying. “For my People” which is going to be featured on your next album, during the making of that song, was it a personal?
PY: Yeah the whole concept of the song was to let Hmong people know that we need to stick together in order to make a difference. People always talk about how they want us “Hmong peoples” to be heard but at the same time they don’t support each other. Now how is that gonna work? We all need to look at the bigger picture.

ASIANCE: Are there any last words for Asian artists who want to step into the music business? What are some advices to give them?
PY: Be yourself. Take criticism as a good thing. Trust me not everyone is gonna like what you do. So whatever you do, do it cause you want to.

Well, I’m out. Holla at me PEOPLES! IT’S LP……

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